Tough Guys, Honest Opinions

Most readers in the 1920s thought that detective fiction meant cozy drawing rooms, antique dueling pistols, and the cool fields of England. It belonged mostly to female writers such as Agatha Christie, Margery Allingham, and Dorothy L. Sayers. These women all came from comfortable middle-class backgrounds. Sayers herself doubled as an academic who translated Dante’s Divine Comedy into English during the height of her fiction career.

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Sell-Out Conference Shrugs Off Anti-Fa

The 15th American Renaissance conference was a bursting-at-the-seams success, with a record attendance limited only by fire-code limits on the number of people permitted in the ball room at Montgomery Bell State Park. Demand was so great that we had to close registration a full month before the conference began, and regretfully turn away what would have probably been another 150 attendees. Our record attendance figure of 300 could easily have been 450.

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Sam Dickson in His Own Words

Interview by Hubert Collins

Sam G. Dickson has been a white activist for longer than many in our movement have been alive. On Sunday, July 30, as at every American Renaissance conference, he will be the closing speaker.  

In this extended interview, Mr. Dickson reflects on his experiences and observations, and ends with advice for others who share his commitment to our people. 

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